Trump’s Russian troubles multiplying

Trump’s Russian troubles multiplying
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Peter Wehner, who served as deputy director of speechwriting in President George W. Bush’s White House is one of many Republicans who were critical of Trump during his campaign run. Nowadays he being joined on the heckler bench by some of the president’s GOP supporters. They have become increasingly concerned about the White House’s responses to those pesky allegations of Russian meddling.

The general consensus is that the administration has handled the continuing rumors of links between the Trump campaign and Russia very poorly.

The Washington Post revealed that Attorney General Jeff Sessions met twice during 2016 with Sergey Kislyak, the Kremlin’s ambassador to the United States. Because Sessions earlier testified under oath that he had had no communications with the Russians, his ability to fairly investigate Russian interference in last year’s election campaign came into question. As a result he recused himself from any involvement in the investigation.

Lying under oath to a congressional body is a crime. Rep. Elijah Cummings has called for Session’s resignation. The Washington Post story, though, is not actual evidence of any wrongdoing on the part of Sessions.

Still, the Russian constroversy caused Retired Gen. Michael Flynn to resign from his position as national security advisor, in the midst charges he misled Vice President Pence over the nature of his conversations with the same Russian last December. 

Pres. Trump has tried to cast the Russian matter in the light of a Democratic plot to delegitimize his election victory, but this issue promises not to go away just because the president says it should.